Reuters: Credit Unions Fail As a Result of Buying Mortgage Bonds

As regulators conclude their long investigation into the cloud of companies and the maze of paths of paperwork and money the real victims are being revealed. We know Pension funds got hit hard and are now underfunded strictly as a result of buying worthless mortgage bonds from investment bankers who promised them protection and transparency but instead proved to be the predator. Now regulators are suing Morgan Stanley for defrauding two credit unions that failed as a result of taking a loss on those bonds — a loss that was a gain to the investment banker.

But they still don’t have it exactly right. The regulators are now freely describing mortgages that were “faulty”, “defective”‘ or “non-conforming”. They are describing bonds whose indentures were violated. Yet the government still stands on the sidelines when we look at the damage caused to millions of homeowners who have been forced from their homes and lost everything. The guise is “personal responsibility” — meaning that homeowners are to blame for what happened to them. Meanwhile the question of ownership of who owns the loan and the balance of the loan are being circumvented through destructive litigation, led by judges who are ill-informed mostly because lawyers have failed to learn securitization of debt.

Thus the government has failed to lead the way to stopping Foreclosures. It is still a basic axiom in the offices of regulators, the courtrooms of the judiciary and in mainstream media that individual borrowers are the people who must take responsibility and pay for the fraud. They should have known better. They should have read the documents. But this “logic” flies in the face that two branches of government have already recognized is that the one party who is at a disadvantage in a mortgage loan transaction and credit generally is the borrower — not the lender.

This issue was officially decided by the Federal Government in The Federal Truth in Lending Act was enacted for just that purpose and reason. The Federal Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act was enacted for just that purpose. And the many states that have enacted deceptive lending statutes that freely borrow from TILA and RESPA. Lawyers need to include this in their pleadings, memorandums and oral arguments to start where we should start — at the beginning. If those mortgages are being settled with the creditors who loaned the money because the loans were defective, and they are being settled with shared risk of loss, then why should our attitude toward borrowers be any different as to the same defective mortgages?

A good starting point would be to find the list of defective mortgages to see if your mortgage is in the
list of mortgages claimed to have been securitized, where the mortgages were described as defective, and where the mortgage bonds were described as fraudulent. Fraudulent appraisals are being ignored in the courtroom despite the clear provisions TILA that makes the appraisal and the viability of the loan the responsibility of the lender. Foreclosure defense attorneys are missing an important part of their argument when they fail to start with the responsibilities of the lender, the reasons why those standards were not applied, and the fact that the real lenders in millions of table-funded (predatory per se– I.e. Presumptively predatory) were being defrauded in two ways — non-conforming defective loans and mortgage bonds.

Of course the agencies could make thing easy by forcing publication of a list of REMIC trusts that have been subject to settlements relating to fraudulent and deceptive lending, and fraudulent and deceptive sale of mortgage bonds. But the truth is that the false axioms of the cloud of companies acting under cover of false claims of securitization are settling in the minds of judges, lawyers and regulators that somehow tens of millions of mostly unsophisticated people conspired to defraud the system. How likely is that? Or is it more likely that mortgage companies were pushing, coercing, lying, and deceiving the borrowers — just as the the lawsuits against the investment banks state? And just as they have done in the past?

Those lawsuits frequently allege that the underlying mortgages were non-compliant and unenforceable. If the investment bankers and investors, insurers and government agencies can agree that those mortgages were not enforceable, why is it that lawyers have not brought that message with them into the courtroom? And when they do, why are judges ignoring the argument. It has already been decided at the highest levels of government that the homeowner is hopelessly outgunned at closing. Why assume anything different? When those laws were passed , the number of loan options was 4 or 5. During this period of mortgage madness and meltdown, the number of mortgage products climbed to over 400 options. Borrowers didn’t do that. It was the mortgage originator who had no risk of loss because the money of the investor was what ended up on the table at closing.

Morgan Stanley

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/09/24/us-morganstanley-creditunion-lawsuit-idUSBRE98N02E20130924

Peeling the Onion: Morgan Stanley Forced to Produce Documents Corroborating Illegal Acts

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What’s the Next Step? Consult with Neil Garfield

For assistance with presenting a case for wrongful foreclosure, please call 520-405-1688, customer service, who will put you in touch with an attorney in the states of Florida, Tennessee, Georgia, California, Ohio, and Nevada. (NOTE: Chapter 11 may be easier than you think).

Editor’s Comment and Practice Tips: There are two things you should know going into foreclosure defense. One is that the best decisions on the trial and appellate level came from cases where both sides were institutional in nature. So if the adversaries were both banks, or one was a managed fund, or perhaps a Homeowners or Condominium Association, the Court was a lot more receptive to the same arguments they routinely rejected from Borrowers. That alone suggests some strategies both for investors and homeowners (particularly those hard hit by the mortgage meltdown). The second is that an increasing number of courts are, in the words of one judge who WAS ruling routinely against borrowers, “getting tired of the sloppiness” with which the loan deals were originated, allegedly transferred and claimed as owned by one of a number of parties. They are entering more orders requiring proof of loss, proof of payment and proof that any financial transaction took place in which the forecloser was either the recipient (payee) or the payor of actual money that exchanged hands.

We have seen how the same homeowner with the same property has been assaulted by two completely different “holders”, neither of whom were creditors, each claiming to be producing the original note — and there it was in all its glory, two “original” notes both of which had been printed the previous day on a very good printer. We have seen how the appraisals went further and further off the reservation under pressure from the banks and how the applications were changed under pressure from the banks to close the deal regardless of outcome or viability of the loan.

Strategically I have been encouraging practicing attorneys to pay close attention to the dozens of lawsuits filed against the banks by institutional plaintiffs — pension funds that bought bogus mortgage bonds, government agencies whose findings might be incorporated as fact in your case (especially if the case settled), HOA’s and banks fighting over priority of liens. The facts alleged are fairly uniform — all leading to the conclusion that the loans were neither underwritten in conformity with industry standards (leading to fraud or breach of contract actions) nor supported by documentation that is enforceable (i.e., the mortgage lien was never perfected and the note was incorrectly fabricated and executed without consideration from the named payees or nominees.

The latest rumble over the lack of prosecution on this mortgage mess has produced the resignation of the guy at DOJ who was supposed to be prosecuting these cases. Maybe the change will come. But by this time int he Savings and Loan scandal of the 1980″s there were more than 800 people sitting behind bars with others on probation. The PBS piece “Untouchables” has kicked up a fore storm over the issue of criminal prosecution. Those cases too should be watched carefully and your wording in your pleading ought to be as close to their wording in their lawsuits especially where they have already survived the usual motion to dismiss.

Robert Schiller the economist who created the black letter basis for measuring economic data relating to the housing industry says we are far from done with the damages and debris left by the mortgage meltdown. And out of 105 economists who participated in an independent survey very few had anything good to say about housing or the economy — with the two inextricably entwined. Fixing housing is not merely about stopping foreclosures or increasing modifications. At the heart of the mortgage meltdown was fraud.

And fraud comes in two flavors — civil and criminal. Both require receivers and restitution if prosecuted properly. Investors and homeowners alike are entitled to receive as much restitution as possible that can be clawed back by properly appointed court receivers. Both were decided by appraisal fraud, by deceptive disclosures in which the actual lender was intentionally concealed so that the investment bank could claim ownership and buy insurance payable to the bank instead of the investors, buy credit default swaps with the same result, and apply for Federal bailout with the same result.

Housing won’t be fixed until the corruption of title caused by a nominee on the mortgage and nominee on the note is fixed and settled. The economy won’t be fixed until investors get their share of the insurance and bailouts. The consumer sector won’t be fixed until all that is done, because it is only after the money is allocated to the investors that we can know the actual balance due, if any, on any of the loans.

One thing we know at this point is that most foreclosures (at least 65% according to the San Francisco study) are initiated by “strangers to the transaction” who were not creditors, holders or anything else that would entitle them to enforce the closing documents on a loan that came not from the named payee but from another source entirely. We know that the “credit bid” submitted at auction was pure fiction and fraud and should be corrected in the property records. And we know that the the proceeds of insurance, credit default swaps and federal bailout should be applied to the receivables owed to the investors. Lastly, we know that when those monies are allocated the balance due on those receivables will be far less than what has been or will be demanded from borrowers in past, present and future foreclosures.

 

NY Times: Morgan Stanley Forced to Reveal Truth

Current Bank Plan Is Same as $10 million Interest Free Loan for Every American

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“I wonder how many audience members know that Bair’s plan is more or less exactly the revenue model for all of America’s biggest banks. You go to the Fed, get a buttload of free money, lend it out at interest (perversely enough, including loans right back to the U.S. government), then pocket the profit.” Matt Taibbi

From Rolling Stone’s Matt Taibbi on Sheila Bair’s Sarcastic Piece

I hope everyone saw ex-Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation chief Sheila Bair’s editorial in the Washington Post, entitled, “Fix Income Inequality with $10 million Loans for Everyone!” The piece might have set a world record for public bitter sarcasm by a former top regulatory official.

In it, Bair points out that since we’ve been giving zero-interest loans to all of the big banks, why don’t we do the same thing for actual people, to solve the income inequality program? If the Fed handed out $10 million to every person, and then got each of those people to invest, say, in foreign debt, we could all be back on our feet in no time:

Under my plan, each American household could borrow $10 million from the Fed at zero interest. The more conservative among us can take that money and buy 10-year Treasury bonds. At the current 2 percent annual interest rate, we can pocket a nice $200,000 a year to live on. The more adventuresome can buy 10-year Greek debt at 21 percent, for an annual income of $2.1 million. Or if Greece is a little too risky for you, go with Portugal, at about 12 percent, or $1.2 million dollars a year. (No sense in getting greedy.)

Every time I watch a Republican debate, and hear these supposedly anti-welfare crowds booing the idea of stiffer regulation of Wall Street, I wonder how many audience members know that Bair’s plan is more or less exactly the revenue model for all of America’s biggest banks. You go to the Fed, get a buttload of free money, lend it out at interest (perversely enough, including loans right back to the U.S. government), then pocket the profit.

Considering that we now know that the Fed gave out something like $16 trillion in secret emergency loans to big banks on top of the bailouts we actually knew about, you might ask yourself: How are these guys in financial trouble? How can they not be making mountains of money, risk-free? But they are in financial trouble:

• We’re about to see yet another big blow to all of the usual suspects – Goldman, Citi, Bank of America, and especially Morgan Stanley, all of whom face potential downgrades by Moody’s in the near future.

We’ve known this was coming for some time, but the news this week is that the giant money-managing firm BlackRock is talking about moving its business elsewhere. Laurence Fink, BlackRock’s CEO, told the New York Times: “If Moody’s does indeed downgrade these institutions, we may have a need to move some business around to higher-rated institutions.”

It’s one thing when Zero Hedge, William Black, myself, or some rogue Fed officers in Dallas decide to point fingers at the big banks. But when big money players stop trading with those firms, that’s when the death spirals begin.

Morgan Stanley in particular should be sweating. They’re apparently going to be downgraded three notches, where they’ll be joining Citi and Bank of America at a level just above junk. But no worries: Bank CFO Ruth Porat announced that a three-level downgrade was “manageable” and that only losers rely totally on agencies like Moody’s to judge creditworthiness. “A lot of clients are doing their own credit work,” she said.

• Meanwhile, Bank of America reported its first-quarter results yesterday. Despite that massive ongoing support from the Fed, it earned just $653 million in the first quarter, but astonishingly the results were hailed by most of the financial media as good news. Its home-turf paper, the San Francisco Chronicle, crowed that BOA “Posts Higher Profits As Trading Results Rebound.” Bloomberg, meanwhile, summed up results this way: “Bank of America Beats Analyst Estimates As Trading Jumps.”

But the New York Times noted that BOA’s first-quarter profit of $653 million was down from $2 billion a year ago, and paled compared to results of more successful banks like Chase and Wells Fargo.

Zero Hedge, meanwhile, posted an amusing commentary on BOA’s results, pointing out that the bank quietly reclassified nearly two billion dollars’ worth of real estate loans. This is from BOA’s report:

During 1Q12, the bank regulatory agencies jointly issued interagency supervisory guidance on nonaccrual policies for junior-lien consumer real estate loans. In accordance with this new guidance, beginning in 1Q12, we classify junior-lien home equity loans as nonperforming when the first-lien loan becomes 90 days past due even if the junior-lien loan is performing. As a result of this change, we reclassified $1.85B of performing home equity loans to nonperforming.

In other words, Bank of America described nearly two billion dollars of crap on their books as performing loans, until the government this year forced them to admit it was crap.

ZH and others also noted that BOA wildly underestimated its exposure to litigation, but that’s nothing new. Anyway, despite the inconsistencies in its report, and despite the fact that it’s about to be downgraded – again – Bank of America’s shares are up again, pushing $9 today.

Fraudulent Foreclosure Remedy: Return of the Home

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     “….employees and agents of a number of banks had used the system to “repeatedly” submit court documents on mortgage holders, “containing false and misleading information that made it appear that the foreclosing party had the authority to bring a case when in fact it may not have [had]“.

Editor’s Comment: 

If you read the release below carefully you’ll discover that Morgan Stanley has literally agreed to pay any fine requested by the Federal Reserve.  The Fed has again determined that the banks are using false, faulty, fraudulent and forged documents in connection with the processing of foreclosures, modification requests and anything else related to the bogus mortgages that have long since been paid. 

I strongly urge all readers of this blog to write letters to the Federal Reserve, the OCC, OTS, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to stop pretending that the acceptance of fines is an adequate substitute for the return of stolen property. 

It is astonishing to me that the apathy and confusion in the media and marketplace have allowed and even promoted the concept that the theft of these homes using fraudulent documents is somehow resolved by the payment of money based on the recurring assumption that the underlying obligation is still due, that the default actually exists, and that the enforcement through foreclosure is a foregone conclusion. 

In nearly all cases the enforcement of the note and mortgage is far from a foregone conclusion.  In fact, the reason why none of these cases have actually reached trial where evidence was required to be submitted, is that the original documents signed by the borrower are fatally defective.  These defects are not merely technical. These defects reveal the fact that at the option of the securitization participants, they shifted the risk of loss from the borrower to the investor and eventually to the US taxpayer.  The right to use collateral pledged to a complete stranger to the transaction was void from the beginning, waived several times, and unenforceable since the original debt was paid off completely.

Any lawyer that goes into court without understanding these facts is going to concede issues that will doom his client to failure and loss of the home.  Any lawyer that puts these facts in issue, especially if accompanied by third party reports and services provided by this blog and many other sources, will be forcing the judge to either allow litigation to proceed into the discovery stage (at which point the case will settle), or face an appeal where there were clearly issues of fact that the judge disallowed based upon bias and prejudice. 

Homeowners should understand by now that they are not deadbeats.  They are victims of a fraudulent scheme to sell bogus securities to pension funds which in turn are now limited in their ability to pay benefits to the same victims who were depending upon that income to pay for the house they acquired in transactions that did not comply with Federal or State lending laws.  This is not a matter where the identity of the creditor and compensation to various undisclosed parties were omitted.  In this case we now know with certainty that these disclosures required under law, were actively hidden from both the borrower and the investor even after many borrowers confronted the banks and servicers with clear evidence that there were two parts to each transaction, to wit: the closing with the borrower, and the closing with the investor.  None of the foreclosures reveal the terms of repayment to the investor as per that portion of the total documentation that set forth repayment to the investor/creditor (i.e. the so-called securitization documents with which the participants in the securitization chain were in constant non-compliance). 

Special message to the borrowers:  You are not a deadbeat if you refuse to make a payment that is not due.  The securitization method used by Wall Street merely employed your signature for the purpose of making profits that actually exceeded the total amount of your mortgage.  If you want to oversimplify the matter then think of it this way: who should get the “free house”, a bank that never loaned the money and was paid many times over or a homeowner who invested their last pennies into a deal that was fraudulently presented?  If you put it another way, had you known that the appraisal was inflated and that there were at least a half-dozen levels of fees, commissions and trading profits being earned on your transaction, would you still have entered into the transaction?  More specifically, if you knew that the fees and profits generated exceeded the principal due on your mortgage, would you have entered into the transaction?  I invite you to consider the possibility that you were not a borrower incurring a legitimate debt but rather a victim in a con game that was so well played that you still believe you owe money that your own tax and pension dollars have long since paid off.  Here’s another way of thinking about it; imagine that you have been paying your “debt” from your checking account while at the same time the bank was withdrawing the same amount or more from your savings account for the same debt.  Now they wish to declare you in default because you refuse to pay from your checking account.  Your answer should not be “you’re right, I’m a deadbeat.” Your answer should be, “You’re a thief and I’m reporting you to the police.”

So now you’ve gone to the police and they’ve verified the skullduggery of the banks.  The remedy that the police are asking you to accept is that the police will receive a fine or contribution of $100 and you’re still expected to pay out of your checking account or they’ll take the house, and guess what, they’re still going to continue taking money out of your savings account.

Morgan Stanley to be fined in electronic mortgage system and foreclosure scandal

Bank criticized over Saxon unit’s automatic robo signing of foreclosures

By Leo King

The US Federal Reserve has issued a punishing court order to Morgan Stanley, as it prepares to fine the bank over the use of automated ‘robo signing’ of documents relating to foreclosures for struggling US mortgage payers. It ordered the bank to make significant process, data and systems improvements.

The issue relates to a troubled electronic mortgage registry created by a range of the largest banks, which is allegedly plagued with errors. Those that have brought claims against the banks have said access to the database was deliberately restricted by the banks, and that mortgage foreclosures were often based on incorrect data entered by the banks as they rushed to offload the loans.

The court order issued this week concerns the Saxon business, which Morgan Stanley has sold to mortgage servicing group Ocwen Financial. The Fed said Morgan Stanley retained responsibility for the impact of Saxon’s actions. Saxon had issued over 225,000 residential mortgage loans.

Robo-signing typically involves employees of mortgage servicing companies automatically signing off foreclosure papers without checking them, in the interests of fast processing the papers.

The practice was allegedly supported by the Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems (MERS), which opponents claim may have resulted in unfair foreclosures for many home buyers. The database was created in 1995 to simplify the recording of mortgage sales and to allow banks to more easily sell on loans.

According to recent complaints by New York State against a number of banks, as well as being used fraudulently, the database was also “plagued with inaccuracies and errors”. New York State Attorney General Eric Schneidermann said that employees and agents of a number of banks had used the system to “repeatedly” submit court documents on mortgage holders, “containing false and misleading information that made it appear that the foreclosing party had the authority to bring a case when in fact it may not have [had]“.

“The banks created the MERS system as an end-run around the property recording system, to facilitate the rapid securitization and sale of mortgages,” said Schneiderman in February.

“Once the mortgages went sour, these same banks brought foreclosure proceedings en masse based on deceptive and fraudulent court submissions, seeking to take homes away from people with little regard for basic legal requirements or the rule of law.”

This week, the Federal Reserve issued its court order, known as a consent order, against Morgan Stanley. The order demands that the bank hire an independent consultant to review its foreclosures, and said the bank was required to “provide remediation to borrowers who suffered financial injury as a result of wrongful foreclosures or other deficiencies identified in a review of the foreclosure process”.

Should Morgan Stanley decide to re-enter the mortgage servicing business while the consent order is in effect, it will be “required to implement enhanced corporate governance, risk-management, compliance, borrower communication, servicing, and foreclosure practices” that were “comparable” to enforcement actions against other banks over the same issue.

The consent order against Morgan Stanley orders the bank to create a proper plan around acceptable usage of MERS, including strict processes around proper data entry on MERS and around the appointment of officers authorized by MERS.

Additionally, Morgan Stanley and Saxon were ordered to create a proper plan for the use of strong management information systems to inform correct decision-making around mortgages and foreclosures. The systems also needed to monitor compliance with legal requirements, ensure the accuracy of records around money owed and any foreclosure proceedings, and provide all information officers need from borrowers.

High-risk residential mortgages have remained a key focus of attention since the financial crisis, because many troubled and complex financial products were based on them.

Last year, the Federal Reserve issued a similar consent order against Goldman Sachs. The robo signing scandal has engulfed a swathe of the largest US banks, with others including Bank of America, Citi, JP Morgan and Wells Fargo also being investigated.

In the Morgan Stanley case, the Federal Reserve said that in 2009 and 2010 Saxon had begun 60,313 foreclosures on home buyers judged to be struggling to pay their mortgages. It accused the company of engaging in “a pattern of misconduct and negligence in residential mortgage loan servicing and foreclosure”.

Morgan Stanley had not commented at the time of writing, but has agreed to pay whatever fine the Fed sets.

EFFECTIVE USE OF WHAT THE MORTGAGE GIANTS SAY ABOUT EACH OTHER

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The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) filed suit against 17 lead defendants. Lawyers and pro se litigants and anyone with a mortgage subject to a possible claim that the loan was securitized should be interested and follow the allegations AND the wrangling over discovery. There are forms in there that can and should be used by litigants. When counsel for pretender lenders proffers facts not in evidence then your objection should be coupled with “that’s not what they said when they were litigating with FHFA.” And then quote what they DID say in writing versus the oral proffers of counsel who can later say he was “mistaken.”
Complaints have been filed against the following lead defendants:

  1. Ally Financial Inc. f/k/a GMAC, LLC
  2. Bank of America Corporation
  3. Barclays Bank PLC
  4. Citigroup, Inc.
  5. Countrywide Financial Corporation
  6. Credit Suisse Holdings (USA), Inc.
  7. Deutsche Bank AG
  8. First Horizon National Corporation
  9. General Electric Company
  10. Goldman Sachs & Co.
  11. HSBC North America Holdings, Inc.
  12. JPMorgan Chase & Co.
  13. Merrill Lynch & Co. / First Franklin Financial Corp.
  14. Morgan Stanley
  15. Nomura Holding America Inc.
  16. The Royal Bank of Scotland Group PLC
  17. Société Générale

The following Reports to the Congress from the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) present the findings of the agency’s annual examinations of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac (Enterprises), the 12 Federal Home Loan Banks (FHLBanks), and the Office of Finance. This report meets the statutory requirements of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness Act of 1992, as amended by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA).  The views in this report are those of FHFA and do not necessarily represent those of the President.

To request hard copies of FHFA Reports to Congress, contact: FHFA’s Office of Congressional Affairs and Communications
Phone: (202) 414-6922 or send e-mail to:   FHFAinfo@FHFA.gov

 

MERS: A FAILED ATTEMPT AT BYPASSING STATE AND FEDERAL AUTHORITY

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Fannie-Freddie’s Hypocritical Suit Against Banks Making Loans that GSEs Helped Create

Fannie-Freddie’s Hypocritical Suit Against Banks Making Loans that GSEs Helped Create

EDITOR’S NOTE:  Practically everything that the government is doing with respect to the economy and the housing market in particular is hypocritical. If we look to the result to determine the intent of the government you can see why nothing is being done to improve DOMESTIC market conditions. By removing the American consumer from the marketplace (through elimination of available funds in equity, savings or credit) the economic prospects for virtually every marketplace in the world is correspondingly diminished. The downward pressure on economic performance worldwide creates a panic regarding debt and currency. By default (and partially because of the military strength of the United States) people are ironically finding the dollar to be the safest haven during a bad storm.

 The result is that the federal government is able to borrow funds at interest rates that are so low that the investor is guaranteed to lose money after adjusting for inflation. The climate that has been created is one in which investors are far more concerned with preservation of capital than return on capital. In a nutshell, this is why the credit markets are virtually frozen with respect to the average potential consumer, the average small business owner, and the average entrepreneur or innovator who would otherwise start a new business and fuel rising employment.

 While it is true that the lawsuits by Fannie and Freddie are appropriate regardless of their past hypocritical behavior, they are really only rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. Ultimately there must be a resolution to our current economic problems that is based in reality rather than the power to manipulate events. The scenario we all seek  would cleanup the rising title crisis, end the foreclosure crisis, and restore a true marketplace in the purchase and sale of real estate. We have all known for decades that the housing market drives the economy.

 There is obviously very little confidence that the government and market makers in the United States are going to seek any resolution based in reality. Therefore while investors are parking their money in dollars they are also driving up the price of gold and finding other innovative ways to preserve their wealth. As these innovations evolve it is almost certain that an alternative to the United States dollar will emerge. The driving force behind this innovation is the stagnation of the credit markets and the world marketplace. My opinion is that the United States is pursuing a policy that virtually guarantees the creation of a new world reserve currency.

 The creation of MERS was a private attempt to substitute private business plans for public laws. It didn’t work. The lawsuits by the government-sponsored entities together with lawsuits from investors who were duped into being lenders and homeowners who were duped into being borrowers in a rigged market are only going to result in money judgments and money settlements. With a nominal value of credit derivatives at over $600 trillion and the actual money supply at under $50 trillion there is literally not enough money in the world to fix this problem. The problem can only be fixed by recognizing and applying existing law to existing transactions.

 This means that MERS, already discredited, must be treated as a nonexistent entity in the world of real estate transactions. Nobody wants to do that because the failure to disclose an actual creditor on the face of a purported lean or encumbrance on land is a fatal defect in perfecting the lien. This is true throughout the country and it is obvious to anyone who has studied real property transactions and mortgages. If you don’t have the name and address of the creditor from whom you can obtain a satisfaction of mortgage, then you don’t have a mortgage that attaches to the land as a lien. It is this realization that is forming a number of lawsuits from the investors who advanced money for mortgage bonds. Those advances were the funds that were used to finance pornographic Wall Street profits with the balance used to fund absurd mortgage products.

 This is basic property law and public policy. There can be no confidence or consistency in the marketplace without a buyer or a lender knowing that they can rely upon the information contained in a government title Registry at the county recording office. Any other method requires them to take the word of someone without the authority of the government. This is a fact and it is the law. But the banks are successfully using politics to sidestep the basic essential elements of law. Under their theory the fact that the mortgage lien was never perfected would be ignored so that bank and non-bank institutions could become the largest landholders in the country without ever having spent a dime on loaning any money or purchasing the receivables. Politics is trumping law.

 The narrative and the debate are being absolutely controlled by Wall Street interests. We say we don’t like what the banks did and many say they don’t like banks at all. But it is also true that the same people who say they don’t like banks are willing to let the banks keep their windfall and make even more money at the expense of the taxpayer, the consumer and the homeowner. There are trillions of dollars available for investment in business expansion, government projects, and good old American innovation to drive a healthy economy. It won’t happen until we begin to drive the debate ourselves and force government and banking to conform to rules and laws that have been in existence for centuries.

from STOP FORECLOSURE FRAUD…………….

Lets NOT forget both Fannie and Freddie, like most of the named banks they are suing, each are shareholders of MERS.

Again, who gave the green light to eliminate the need for assignments and to realize the greatest savings, lenders should close loans using standard security instruments containing “MOM” language back in April 26, 1999?

This was approved by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac which named MERS as Original Mortgagee (MOM)!

Open Market-

“U.S. is set to sue dozen big banks over mortgages,” reads the front-page headline in today’s New York Times. The “deck” below the headline explains that that the Federal Housing Finance Agency, which oversees the government-sponsored enterprises Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, is “seen as arguing that lenders lacked due diligence” in the loans they made.

A more apt description would probably be that Fannie and Freddie are suing the banks for selling them the very loans the GSEs helped designed and that government mandates encourage — and are still encouraging them to make. These conflicted actions are just one more of the government’s contributions to the uncertainty that is helping to keep unemployment at 9 percent.

Strangely the author of the Times piece, Nelson Schwartz, ignores the findings of a recent blockbuster

[OPEN MARKET]

MOTION TO DISMISS DENIED: FRAUD ALLEGED V MORGAN STANLEY

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It is interesting how the same allegations made by an institution are taken more seriously. In fact, the Court leaves in the prayer for punitive, consequential and future damages. Here MBIA is suing Morgan Stanley for lying about the risks and the nature of what they were buying. It’s all about the mortgages. Below I’ve selected some of the more interesting passages from the order denying Morgan Stanley’s Motion to Dismiss. While Judges routinely dismiss or otherwise are dismissive of homeowner complaints about the exact same thing by the exact same parties, they tend to take it more seriously when another institution says the same thing.

I remind the readers that we have repeatedly predicted the ankle-biting complaints amongst the giants that participated in the Ponzi scheme, whether knowingly or not. The obvious move by MBIA raises the question of why the same move has not been vigorously prosecuted by AIG, which played such a central role in funding the ill-gotten escape hatch for bankers.

“a vast number of of mortgage loans were made to borrowers who could not reasonably be expected to be able to repay their mortgage debt.”

As to MBIA Third PArty Guarantee and Payment: “This guarantee of repayment of principal and interest for the RMBS notes increased their marketability.”

“MBIA contends that these misrepresentations and failures ‘fundamentally distorted the risk profile represented to MBIA and raised the likelihood of losses’. Had MBIA known the truth it would not have issued the certificate insurance policy.” [Editor's Note: Had ANYONE known the truth there would have been no mortgage bonds to  sell, no loans to make, no borrowers signing on the dotted line. Even here, the Judge assumes the Morgan acquired the loans when all indications are that it never did so. The Judge's assumption is most likely the result of a bad assumption by the writer's of the complaint for MBIA. The truth is that the loans never made it into the pools, there was nothing to insure, and the entire proposition is "all or nothing" with the emphasis on the NOTHING.]

“Morgan Stanley argues in essence that MBIA’s fraud claim must be dismissed because it is duplicative of the breach of contract claim. It is not. A fraudulent inducement claim may be sustained when it is alleged that misrepresentations contained in documents collateral to the contract were made to induce the Plaintiff to enter into the contract in the first place…” [Editor's comment: Applying exactly this logic to the borrower, the "contract" was fraudulently induced by misrepresenting the appraised value of the property, misrepresenting the underwriting of the loan including parties and terms and viability, and misrepresenting the risk that the "lender" was taking (none). Thus our assertion on these pages that the primary claim is fraud in the inducement, as to damages, and quiet title, as to the lien, is corroborated by these simple statement of obvious black letter law by this Judge.]

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