Tampa Trial Judge Rules for Borrower Where Correct Objections Were Made

Patrick Giunta, Esq. brought this case to my attention.

Here is a case between the famed Florida Default Law Group, who reached distinction amidst accusations of fabricated documents, and an ordinary borrower represented by a St. Peterburg trial lawyer, John R. Cappa, who apparently knows the timing and content of the right objections. The result was involuntary dismissal against the foreclosing party.

The basis of the ruling was that the default had never been proven, the Plaintiff never offered proof of “rights to enforce” and tangentially the business records were not qualified as an exception to the hearsay rule. The witness admitted he knew nothing about the payment history of the borrower and was relying on the reports in front of him — something that is hearsay on hearsay. If anything corroborates my insistence on denying everything that is deniable, this case does exactly that. If the borrower admitted the default, admitted the note, admitted the mortgage, all that would be off bounds at trial because they would be facts NOT in issue.

In this case, like so many others the Plaintiff offered the letter giving notice of default BEFORE the FOUNDATION was established that there was in fact a default. I might add that non-payment is not a default if the actual creditor received payments anyway (servicer advances etc.), which is why I make a big deal about identifying the party who is the creditor — the person or entity that is actually owed the money. So the objections are relevance, foundation and hearsay.

Note that the Plaintiff failed to introduce proof of the right to enforce, even if they had THE note or any note. This has been the subject of numerous articles on this website. Being a holder means you can file suit, but without proving you are a holder with rights to enforce, you lose. And the way to prove that you have the rights to enforce is to provide some sort of written instrument that specifically says you have the right to enforce. It is the only logical ruling. Otherwise anyone could steal a note and enforce it without ever committing perjury.

While there are other objections that I think could have been raised, Cappa was confident enough in his position that he narrowed his attack onto issues that the Judge was required to follow. The Judge was confident that an appellate court would affirm his decision.

Take a look at the transcript and see if you don’t agree that there is something to be learned here. Forcing the Plaintiff to actually prove their case frequently results in judgment for the borrower. The reason is simple where you have originators who admit they actually did the loan on behalf of others and there are questions as to who was the servicer and when. Most importantly, there is a quote here in which Cappa says “just because they sent a default letter doesn’t mean that a default occurred” He’s right. It only means they sent the letter. The truth of the matter asserted (default) is hearsay. And being “familiar with a report allegedly gleaned from business records doesn’t mean you can testify that the payments were processed properly nor that you have any personal knowledge of the record keeping procedures that were used — even with 20+ years experience in the business.

Trial PHH Mortgage v. Parish

 

4 Responses

  1. It sounds like , the print shop should open next door to the court .
    God save the smart Florida Judges .

  2. 2nd on not being able to link the case. Please can anyone relink it?

  3. The link to the case does not work.

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