Old Habits Die Hard: Rescission Confusion Continues Despite Supreme Court Clarity

You know something stupid is going on when you see tens of millions of dollars spent on ads enticing consumers to get a loan at 2.99%. There is no profit at that rate so something else is going on — leading to the conclusion that disclosure from the start has been misleading — unknown to the borrower.

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Let me put it this way: even the borrower lacks the authority to undo the rescission which is effective by operation of law. The loan, the note and mortgage are canceled. If the borrower wants to reinstate them, the borrower would need to get together with the creditor and sign new documents for a new loan transaction.

see Hiding-in-Plain-Sight_-Jesinoski-and-the-Consumer_s-Right-of-Rescind

A recent law review article from the law school at Duke University gets a lot of things right. But it still gets some key points wrong. You will see highlighted portions that raise questions if you click on the link above. But overall it does provide excellent background on the Truth in Lending Act and rescission.

Some of the errors I found —-

The twenty days applies to the duties of the “lender” or “creditor” not to the borrower and the writer completely misses the point in that sentence when he says that the lender must “return the property.” The creditor does not have the property. It might be that this is just poor wording. But as it is written, it is wrong.

There is no procedural bar to asserting the rescission. It is effective by operation of law. That means it is a fact — not a claim yet to be determined. Whether he meant to say that he agreed with what the court was doing or he just got it wrong, I don’t know. Once again we see some very intelligent people who have done a lot of study but still can’t get their heads around a very simple proposition — the statute says the rescission is effective by operation of law. There is nothing left to be done. That means the note and mortgage are void (REG Z and Jesinoski). This is substantive law and not subject to change by any procedural rules.

Footnote 102 is also poorly worded indicating that rescission under common law can be effected without suit. It is ONLY TILA rescission that can cancel the loan without suit.

His conclusion is also poorly worded adding to the confusion out there. He should have said that the rescission is effective by operation of law and that from that point forward the loan contract, the note and the mortgage have been nullified and are void, as stated under Reg Z.

Without this point of clarity the simple TILA rescission “procedure” is lost. The big mistake is that people, judges and lawyers continue to view rescission as a pending claim — despite the US Supreme Court stating that courts cannot interpret a statute without finding ambiguity (and being right about that) they don’t have power to change, add, amend or modify the the express wording of the statute. After rescission is sent there is no pending claim. After rescission is sent there is only the fact that the note and mortgage are gone.

My attempt at clarification would be said as follows: if you are in a court or in a transaction after a notice of rescission has been sent, then the previous note and mortgage no longer exist. No court action may be undertaken on an instrument that does not exist. No transaction can ignore the fact that the note and mortgage were canceled and under Reg Z are void.

Lawyers and some scholars continue to miss the point — despite the Jesinoski decision, unanimously in the US Supreme Court (a place where all arguments cease because it is the court of last resort). Old habits die hard. Sanctity of contract seems to be causing a kind of mental pollution causing many people to continue to assert positions based upon the premise that in order for the loan, mortgage and note to be canceled and rendered void upon mailing the notice of rescission, some court action is required or permitted. Let me put it this way: even the borrower lacks the authority to undo the rescission which is effective by operation of law. The loan, the note and mortgage are canceled. If the borrower wants to reinstate them, the borrower would need to get together with the creditor and sign new documents for a new loan transaction.

10 Responses

  1. A 2013 case .. but discusses a lot of our current issues
    http://www2.ca3.uscourts.gov/opinarch/114254p.pdf

  2. S, research wrongful foreclosure.

  3. So, am I mistaken? Does this mean even AFTER being foreclosed on, losing my home, moving out of my home of 32 years, almost 2.5 years ago, that I can still file an effective rescission? (The assignment of my mortgage to “the supposed” trust was nearly four years After receiving the supposed loan)
    Can anyone help here?
    What RESULTS has anyone had under my or anyones’ circumstances?

  4. I think the term “living in denial” is pertinent here. In fact, so much of America and the court system lives in denial. Denial does not work, but I see it every day in every way.

  5. definition of by operation of law

    https://www.nolo.com/dictionary/operation-of-law-term.html

    NEVER AGAIN

  6. Re creditors – big question

  7. Emperor 😐

  8. At the nasty root of it all lies ” belief system” and a kind if self brainwashing, talk to those who claim to know about the housing market and investing – i have, bankers, lawyers business men/ women and you get a feel for why its taking soooo long, the arrogance i have experienced is unreal, a form of the ” the emporor has fine clothes” phenomena when no the emporor is actually naked.

  9. Law has many parallels to the medical profession ” old habits die hard” practice should be research ” evidence based” you cant deny the evidence.

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