GARFIELD PREMISES

Most people really don’t completely understand our premise when we investigate, research, examine and analyze a case or case documents. We have several premises with which we start and check to to see if they apply. While the answer is short the work behind it is long and complicated.

Let us help you plan your foreclosure defense strategy, discovery requests and defense narrative: 202-838-6345. Ask for a Consult.

Purchase now Neil Garfield’s Mastering Discovery and Evidence in Foreclosure Defense webinar including 3.5 hours of lecture, questions and answers, plus course materials that include PowerPoint Presentations. Presenters: Attorney and Expert Neil Garfield, Forensic Auditor Dan Edstrom, Attorney Charles Marshall and and Private Investigator Bill Paatalo. The webinar and materials are all downloadable.

Get a Consult and TEAR (Title & Encumbrances Analysis and & Report) 202-838-6345. The TEAR replaces and greatly enhances the former COTA (Chain of Title Analysis, including a one page summary of Title History and Gaps).

https://www.vcita.com/v/lendinglies to schedule CONSULT, leave message or make payments. It’s better than calling!

THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.

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15 Assumptions we make that show up in all our reports and drafting.

  1. Rescission is an event that occurs upon mailing of the notice. It is not a claim for which the borrower must justify before it becomes effective. It is effective on mailing.
  2. The trusts are empty. They never took part in any transaction in which any loan was purchased. Therefore referring to the loan as being in a trust is erroneous.
  3. The Trusts don’t exist. The use of the Trustee’s name is an accommodation for a fee, and the use of the alleged trust name is the use of a fictitious name of the underwriter for certificates issued in the name of the trust. Hence the certificate owners own nothing (especially since they usually have disclaimed all interest in the debt, note or mortgage.)
  4. Since there is no trust in which the subject loan was entrusted to the named trustee, all claims to servicing rights arising from the written trust instrument (PSA) are also fictitious.
  5. None of the parties in the named trust have any right, title or interest in ownership or servicing the subject loan.
  6. In most cases the named payee on the note was neither a source nor a conduit for funds. All documents, especially mortgage documents, are construed against the drafter of those documents.
  7. The naming of a Payee who is not the source of funding prevents merger of the debt with the note, which can only occur when the payee and creditor are the same.
  8. In most cases the named Payee is different from the the creditor who funded the loan, intentionally or otherwise.
  9. In most cases the recorded mortgage names as creditor (“Lender”) a party (the named payee on the note) who is different from the creditor who funded the loan, intentionally or otherwise.
  10. In most cases (nearly all) the originator of the loan named as Payee on the note and “lender” on the mortgage was never in privity with the actual funding source.
  11. In nearly all cases referring to a lender or servicer as a lender or servicer is erroneous and admits a fact that is not true.
  12. In nearly all cases referring to a trustee as a REMIC Trustee is erroneous and admits a fact that is not true.
  13. In nearly all cases referring to a trustee as a DOT Trustee is erroneous and admits a fact that is not true.
  14. In virtually no case does equitable or legal ownership of the debt get transferred with documents of transfer.
  15. In virtually no case is there a real world transaction in which a loan is purchased and sold. It is the paper that is transferred, not the debt; hence there is no consideration.

Why Everyone (except SCOTUS) is Wrong About TILA Rescission

All contrary arguments are erroneous since they would insert a contingency where the statute contains no room for any contingency. The language of the statute bars any such contingency when it says that the TILA Rescission is effective upon delivery, by operation of law. If anyone wants the statute to say or mean anything different they must get their remedy from the legislature, not the courts, who have no authority whatsoever to interpret the statute otherwise. The status of any case involving foreclosure is that it does not exist. Hence the court is left ONLY with the power to perform the ministerial act of dismissing the case for lack of jurisdiction.

Let us help you plan your TILA RESCISSION strategy, discovery requests and defense narrative: 202-838-6345. Ask for a Consult.

Purchase now Neil Garfield’s Mastering Discovery and Evidence in Foreclosure Defense webinar including 3.5 hours of lecture, questions and answers, plus course materials that include PowerPoint Presentations. Presenters: Attorney and Expert Neil Garfield, Forensic Auditor Dan Edstrom, Attorney Charles Marshall and and Private Investigator Bill Paatalo. The webinar and materials are all downloadable.

Get a Consult and TEAR (Title & Encumbrances Analysis and & Report) 202-838-6345. The TEAR replaces and greatly enhances the former COTA (Chain of Title Analysis, including a one page summary of Title History and Gaps).

https://www.vcita.com/v/lendinglies to schedule CONSULT, leave message or make payments. It’s better than calling!

THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.

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So in answer to questions about putative “modifications”, eviction or unlawful detainer, bankruptcy, and TILA Rescission this is what I have written in response to some inquiries.

Should the rescission be recorded? Not necessarily but

YES. I would like to see it recorded. You need to check with the clerk in the recording office or an attorney who understands recording procedure. Generally recording a document with an old date must be attached to an affidavit that is recorded with the notice of rescission attached. The affidavit explains that the attachment was inadvertently not recorded at the time it was created.

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Should a copy of the notice of rescission be filed in the court record also?

YES. If there is any way to get the recorded document into the court record, it should be pursued.

This presents title issues because if you are recording this long after events have transpired, some of which are also recorded as memorializing transactions, fake or real. Any recorded instruments that purports to be a memorialization of a transaction before the rescission was recorded would generally be given priority.
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The lawyer sent me an answer to my notice of rescission. Now what?
Either file to enforce the duties to be performed (if you are within one year of the date of delivery of the notice of rescission), or file a quiet title action if the one year has expired. There are several different scenarios actually, but this is the one I would focus upon.
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I am getting kicked out of bankruptcy court. Now what?
Getting “kicked out” of BKR court probably means that you are back in the state court system which might open some opportunities for you to get more into the court record. (Like an old rescission).
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My property is being sold. Does that mean that I have to get out?
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They can’t get you out without filing an unlawful detainer (eviction in some jurisdictions) based upon an asserted change of title. There might be a period of time between the sale and the attempt to get you out of the home (eviction or unlawful detainer). If the property is sold to a “third party” they want want rent from you, which could allow you to stay.
The unlawful detainer action presents another opportunity to raise the issue of rescission, since the entire action is based upon a valid change of title. It also sets off potentially another round for appeal, especially on the issue of rescission. Res Judicata and Collateral Estoppel do not apply to jurisdictional issues. If the rescission was mailed then by operation of the law the note and mortgage are void.
The defense is ordinarily that the “sale” was a fabrication based upon fictional claims and was contrary to the notice of rescission, which voided the note and mortgage upon which they were relying. The time for challenging the rescission has long passed. Hence all enforcement actions after the date of the 2009 rescission are void since they were based upon various claims attendant to paper instruments that were void, effective the day of delivery of the rescission.
Note that delivery of TILA Rescission notice is complete when dropped in a USPS mailbox and your testimony that it was sent via US Postal Service is all that is necessary as foundation.
I sent 2 notices of rescissions. Is that better or worse for me?
If I was defending against your claim of rescission I would argue that sending the 2016 rescission was either an admission that the earlier one had not been sent or that it was a concession that, for whatever reason, the 2009 rescission notice had been abandoned.
Hence I suggest you put very little emphasis on the new rescission and maximum emphasis on the old rescission.
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I sent the rescission less than 3 years after the modification but more than 3 years since the alleged consummation. Hoes my rescission affect my loan in that instance?
In most cases “modifications” are not treated as new loans. But the fact that something is called a modification and it really changes everything including the “lender” it may be possible to characterize it as a new loan subject to TILA Rescission. TILA Rescission hinges on whether the “modification” was a new loan — a fact, we would argue — that must be determined by trial. Since intent is part of the analysis of a contract, this could present another opportunity to force them to admit they don’t know the identity or intent of the creditor and whether said creditor had given them authority to make a new contract.
And the underlying narrative for this approach is that as a new contract, the “lender” was required to comply with disclosure requirements at the time of the new contract, thus triggering the three day right of rescission and the the three year limitation. Under my theory, based on Jesinoski, it doesn’t matter whether the three years has expired or not.
We know for certain that the notice of rescission is effective upon mailing; it is not based upon some contingent event or claim or court order. The date of consummation is itself a factual issue that can be in the pleading of the creditor (who is the only one with standing, the note and mortgage having been rendered void) claiming that the notice of rescission should be vacated based upon the three years, the date of consummation etc. 
Any alternative theory that puts the burden on the property owner would be contrary to the express wording of the statute and the SCOTUS ruling in Jesinoski. The statute 15 USC §1635 and SCOTUS are in complete agreement: there is no law suit required to make rescission effective. It would make the statutorily defined TILA Rescission event indefinite, requiring a court ruling before any rescission would be treated seriously. In other words, the opposite of what the statute says and the opposite of what SCOTUS said in Jesinoski. 
All contrary arguments are erroneous since they would insert a contingency where the statute contains no room for any contingency. The language of the statute bars any such contingency when it says that the TILA Rescission is effective upon delivery, by operation of law. If anyone wants the statute to say or mean anything different they must get their remedy from the legislature, not the courts, who have no authority whatsoever to interpret the statute otherwise. The status of any case involving foreclosure is that it does not exist. Hence the court is left ONLY with the power to perform the ministerial act of dismissing the case for lack of jurisdiction.
All this is important because we ought to be heading toward any defensive strategy that reveals the absence of a creditor. We are betting that the fight to conceal the name of the creditor is a cover for not knowing the the identity of the creditor, hence fatally undermining the authority as holder, servicer, trustee or anything else.
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What if consummation never occurred?
It may turn out that consummation between the parties to the note and mortgage never occurred. It’s important to remember that would mean the rescission is irrelevant since the loan contract does not exist. But such a finding by a court of competent jurisdiction would negate the legal effect of the note and mortgage; this is true as long as the note was not purchased for value in good faith by a buyer without knowledge of the borrower’s defenses.
In that case, the burden does shift to the homeowner and it is entirely possible that under that scenario there could be no consummation but nevertheless homeowner liability would continue on the falsely procured note and potentially the mortgage as well. The reason is simple: that is what the State statute says under Article 3 and Article 9 of the UCC, as adopted by all 50 states. The homeowner’s remedy in such a scenario would be limited to actions for damages against the intermediaries who perpetrated the the fraudulent and fictitious “transaction” in which the named lender failed to loan anything.

Why Borrowers Have the Right to Rescind under the Truth In Lending Act

In my opinion any foreclosure judgment or foreclosure sale that took place after a notice of rescission was sent and delivered is completely void and should be treated the same as a wild deed. This is particularly true in cases where courts have ignored the rescission completely and failed to issue an order effectively vacating the rescission. And it is particularly true where the rescission notice was sent within three years of consummation (assuming there was consummation). As with any wild deed, the actions and events subsequent to the void foreclosure judgment and/or void sale are also void. The effect of a rescinded loan is to make the note and mortgage void by operation of law effective the date of mailing or delivery. Void means they don’t legally exist.

Where the rescission was sent within three years of the purported consummation and was completely ignored  I am positive that SCOTUS will agree. And it is at least doubtful, if not legally impossible, that any subsequent law passed by any state legislature could effectively ratify a court’s action where it had no subject matter jurisdiction. In plain language, if the effect is the same as a wild deed, the only way title can be divested from homeowners would be through various state laws governing adverse possession (usually used in boundary disputes, but nonetheless applicable). Absent that, homeowners who have sent notices of TILA Rescission remain the legal owners of the property, even it goes back many years.

The banks know and understand this. They have lobbied extensively and successfully in state legislatures to bar or limit actions to “take back” title. By doing so they distract from the main issue, to wit: homeowners already have title by operation of law and thus need make no claim in court or otherwise. That was the whole point of the TILA Rescission statute as confirmed by SCOTUS in Jesinoski.

Bankers are rejoicing over the nearly universal rejection of TILA Rescission in trial and appellate court — with the notable exception of the Supreme Court of the United States, (SCOTUS) who unanimously ruled in Jesinoski that (a) the statute was constitutional, (b) that the statute was clearly worded thus barring “interpretation”, (c) that no lawsuit was needed to make rescission effective, and (d) that the rescission notice is effective on the date of delivery (mailing, if USPS is used).

Any “logic” or rationale that leads to a result contrary to these points is equally void and without merit simply because it is the law of the land from Congress and from the highest court in the land — SCOTUS. All adverse decisions and arguments are based upon the premise that the statute runs against the grain of personal beliefs that borrowers should never have that much power. Without aggressive enforcement of the consumer rights enunciated in TILA, the rights and protections of the statute and regulations are effectively revoked leaving consumers in the same position they were in back in the 1960’s when the law was considered and passed.

While I am certain that SCOTUS will slap down all the courts of the country who tried imposing limits and restrictions on TILA Rescission, just as it did in Jesinoski, that doesn’t mean that that all cases would be reversible based upon Jesinoski and the next decision.

This is especially true when a court considers TILA Rescission as a claim instead of an event effective by operation of law — just as the statute says it is. The effect on procedure and burdens of proof is enormous.

If you regard it as a claim asserted by the borrower, then the borrower must prove that the rescission was properly sent and for good reasons.

If you regard it as an event, then it is the “lender” who must file a claim seeking to set it aside. The TILA Rescission statute and SCOTUS both state the same thing: rescission is an event that is effective upon mailing (delivery).

The burden is clearly on the party claiming to be a lender to file a claim seeking to vacate the rescission which has same effect as a court order or statutory law. But they must plead and prove standing without using the note and mortgage as the foundation for their assertion of legal standing.

Let us help you plan your TILA RESCISSION strategy, discovery requests and defense narrative: 202-838-6345. Ask for a Consult.

Purchase now Neil Garfield’s Mastering Discovery and Evidence in Foreclosure Defense webinar including 3.5 hours of lecture, questions and answers, plus course materials that include PowerPoint Presentations. Presenters: Attorney and Expert Neil Garfield, Forensic Auditor Dan Edstrom, Attorney Charles Marshall and and Private Investigator Bill Paatalo. The webinar and materials are all downloadable.

Get a Consult and TEAR (Title & Encumbrances Analysis and & Report) 202-838-6345. The TEAR replaces and greatly enhances the former COTA (Chain of Title Analysis, including a one page summary of Title History and Gaps).

https://www.vcita.com/v/lendinglies to schedule CONSULT, leave message or make payments. It’s better than calling!

THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.

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In the 1960’s Congress was faced with a problem. The banks were forever seeking ways to deceive borrowers in increasingly complex loan transactions. Congress was passing TILA, but in order to have any effect in protecting consumers, a compliance enforcement mechanism was needed.

One choice was to create a massive new federal government agency to enforce compliance with the new Truth in Lending Act (TILA). Nobody took that seriously because of the huge expense and logistical problems in analyzing the closing statements on each loan and selectively auditing loans during their term to see if the disclosures were correct or had been false or misleading. Tens of thousands of people would need to be hired, trained, and educated. Systems would have had to be invented to keep track of the huge amount of data that would be collected.

The other path was to create a self activating mechanism that would impose draconian penalties on lenders who violate the law and spirit of TILA. Faced with virtual loss of the loan the banks would scrupulously comply. The extraordinary provision gave consumers the right to rescind the transaction if they believed they had been deceived — i.e., that the disclosures were absent, false or misleading (all of which apply to loans during the great meltdown leading up to the 2008 crash).

Key to the effectiveness of the statute is that there was no requirement that the borrower had to be right, inasmuch as this would enable banks to stonewall even further. Nothing was required except that the borrower send a notice of rescission. The entire burden thus falls completely and solely on the “lender” to apply to a court of competent jurisdiction to vacate the rescission, which was effective by operation of law, upon mailing or delivery.

Congress rejected any notion that consumers had to go see a lawyer or a court in order to get redress for the consumer’s perceived grievances. Hence the TILA Rescission statute was passed stating that the rescission was effective by operation of law upon delivery (or mailing). 

For years the banks had internal controls that usually assured compliance, although there were some major exceptions. Then starting in the 1990’s the banks embarked on a scheme that required  violations of the protections afforded by TILA. When people sent notices of rescission they were frequently ignored or “contested” by a letter.

In court, judges were driven by a fear that such power delivered into the hands of borrowers with little to lose might destroy the entire socio-economic fabric of the country and that the “sanctity of contract” must be upheld. Accordingly judges began to “interpret the statute thus imposing limits and restrictions that effectively denuded the primary objective of the legislation — to punish participants in the lending process for withholding disclosures or making false and misleading disclosures.

In short, as pointed out by SCOTUS in the Jesinoski decision  judges were attempting to legislate from the bench by proclaiming what the judge thought the statute should have said. SCOTUS truck down all the restrictions and limitations invented by the courts and appellate courts that affirmed such decisions. Still judges try to avoid the draconian results on “lenders” that were intended by Congress and President Johnson. And so the real truth about these loans and these foreclosures is still emerging very slowly.

The practice pointer here is that lawyers should not present rescission as a claim for any relief except perhaps enforcement of TILA Rescission duties imposed on lenders. The relief has already been granted by Congress. Don’t fall into the trap of alleging the rescission as a claim in a complaint or in affirmative defenses. The proper motion is a motion to dismiss. In the absence of an actual pleading setting forth standing and the timely contest (20 days) of whether the rescission should have been sent, the “lenders” either must admit they are not lenders or comply with the three duties imposed by delivery of  TILA Rescission:

  1. Return of moneys to the homeowner/borrower
  2. Return of the canceled original note
  3. Cancellation and release of the mortgage recorded in public records.

It is only after the lender has complied or a court has vacated the borrower’s rescission that the creditor or obligee can demand money from the homeowner/borrower. But here is the rub: Under TILA Rescission, there might to recover money arises from either timely compliance with the statue or an order vacating the rescission. The right to receive money under TILA Rescission arises from the rescission statute, not the debt, note or mortgage. If no claim has been made under TILA within 1 year, then the debt is unenforceable. And no claim can remade without compliance with the TILA Rescission statutes.

 

 

 

 

 

Securitization and Standing

Like other decisions establishing  the law of the land, the decisions of SCOTUS are often taken as advisory or optional. Nevertheless TILA Rescission and Article III standing have been affirmed by the Court of last resort. Reluctant judges in trial and appellate courts will get their hands slapped one more time but all the bad prior decisions and their consequences  are neither reversed nor redressed.

Standing is pretty easy — it must be alleged in facts that will be proven at trial. If it isn’t alleged or isn’t proven at trial, the Court lacks jurisdiction to do anything other than to dismiss the claims of any party seeking satisfaction because they have no claim for redress.

Let us help you plan your defense strategy, discovery requests and defense narrative: Dial 954-451-1230 or 202-838-6345. Ask for a Consult.

Purchase now Neil Garfield’s Mastering Discovery and Evidence in Foreclosure Defense webinar including 3.5 hours of lecture, questions and answers, plus course materials that include PowerPoint Presentations. Presenters: Attorney and Expert Neil Garfield, Forensic Auditor Dan Edstrom, Attorney Charles Marshall and and Private Investigator Bill Paatalo. The webinar and materials are all downloadable.

Get a Consult and TEAR (Title & Encumbrances Analysis and & Report) 954-451-1230 or 202-838-6345. The TEAR replaces and greatly enhances the former COTA (Chain of Title Analysis, including a one page summary of Title History and Gaps).

https://www.vcita.com/v/lendinglies to schedule CONSULT, leave message or make payments. It’s better than calling!

THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.

See 2017 US Supreme Court case defining burden of PLEADING legal standing: Town of Chester v. Laroe Estates, Inc., 137 S. Ct. 1645, 1650-1651 (2017)

There are three elements of standing:

  1. The party claiming the ultimate relief (like the party seeking foreclosure) MUST have already suffered an injury in fact — one that is “concrete and particularized.” This means that alleging a default is not enough. The presumption that the pleading party suffered economic loss only arises if they plead and prove that they had a right to payment which was not received, thus constituting a default. Nobody alleges that because it isn’t true. Nobody is entitled to any satisfaction in court without pleading and proving facts that the alleged default actually caused financial loss (injury) to the party seeking relief (or the disclosed principal in an agency relationship with the party seeking foreclosure). This feature is particularly twisted in nonjudicial states where the party makes no claim for foreclosure; instead they merely file papers in the county records and put the home up for sale. Standing is nonetheless required in both judicial and nonjudicial states — a fact often ignored in most courtrooms.
  2. The injury must be traceable to conduct of the party alleged to be in default or breach. Hence the party seeking satisfaction through foreclosure must establish that they had a legal right to receive the payments that were specified in the note and mortgage (deed of trust) either because they own the debt or because they represent someone else who owns the debt. Failure to reveal the party who owns the debt leaves the court without any pleading or proof as to who, if anyone, was financially injured when the homeowner stopped making payments to a party that could possibly be the authorized representative to receive such payments and also could possibly not be the authorized party to receive payments. The presumption of injury only arises  when the right to receive payments is both alleged and proven. Once again, courts have twisted this element beyond recognition. The missing creditor is presumed to exist, without a name or any other identifying characteristics.
  3. The injury, once established, must be likely to be redressed by a favorable judicial decision. So if the foreclosure occurs and the sale is made, what will be the ultimate result of liquidation of the property. The answer is that unrelated parties will enjoy the fruits of foreclosure, which is why servicers are under strict instructions not to reveal the recipient of funds paid by putative borrowers. The proceeds from the sale of the property must be claimed by the party seeking foreclosure or claimed by the party on whose behalf the foreclosure was pursued (assuming that party is the owner of the debt and not another conduit). The trusts are all conduits if they claim REMIC status. That is why there are never allegations that the trust owns the debt or is anything other than other than a “holder.” The right to enforce appears to be presumed but is inaccurate since the Trustee and the Trust were absent from any transaction involving the subject loan. So if the proceeds are not going to the party who loaned money and are not going to anyone who bought the debt, there is no subject matter jurisdiction. Here again the courts are twisting laws beyond comprehension by presuming everything that is not susceptible to proof.

The side note is that it does not appear that the REMIC trusts actually exist or were involved in any financial transaction relating to the loans that lawyers claim it owns. SO the claimant does not exist leaving the court without any semblance of jurisdiction if the pleadings are scrutinized for allegations that the “Trust” is a REMIC business trust organized and existing under the laws of the State of New York, for example. They don’t make that allegation — common to all other pleadings in other civil cases — because the trust is merely a graphic image having no significance except for the purposes of foreclosure.

 

TILA RESCISSION: The war is NOT over contrary to bank disinformation

The banks have not asked for an order vacating a TILA RESCISSION because they know that following standard procedure would block  them from challenging TILA RESCISSION.

This is PROCEDURE vs SUBSTANCE. That is what this has always been about. As more courts continue to “rule” on TILA RESCISSION, getting it wrong every time, the effort to discredit TILA RESCISSION is picking up steam.

Here is the bottom line: I never said that the borrower would always prevail if challenged. I only said that the borrower must be challenged if a creditor wants to avoid the consequences of rescission. And failing to do that means that the rescission stands, by operation of law. I have also said that only a party with standing can bring that challenge and that on its face such a party does not seem to be the same as the party seeking to enforce the paper.

Let us help you plan your TILA RESCISSION strategy, discovery requests and defense narrative: 202-838-6345. Ask for a Consult.

Purchase now Neil Garfield’s Mastering Discovery and Evidence in Foreclosure Defense webinar including 3.5 hours of lecture, questions and answers, plus course materials that include PowerPoint Presentations. Presenters: Attorney and Expert Neil Garfield, Forensic Auditor Dan Edstrom, Attorney Charles Marshall and and Private Investigator Bill Paatalo. The webinar and materials are all downloadable.

Get a Consult and TEAR (Title & Encumbrances Analysis and & Report) 202-838-6345. The TEAR replaces and greatly enhances the former COTA (Chain of Title Analysis, including a one page summary of Title History and Gaps).

https://www.vcita.com/v/lendinglies to schedule CONSULT, leave message or make payments. It’s better than calling!

THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.

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In the past couple of weeks I have received hate mail from those who are pretending  to be on the side of homeowners whilst adamantly opposing TILA Rescission. The banks are more scared of TILA RESCISSION than anything else. So their effort is directed at discrediting the express wording of the statute, the Supreme Court decision directly on point and of course anyone (e.g., me) who persists in pushing the use of TILA RESCISSION. I will say openly that the courts have managed to tie up rescission now just as they did before SCOTUS stopped them. And once again, SCOTUS will administer a stern warning about playing with the express wording a clearly worded statute.

Remember when the general rule was that rescission was a claim and not an event — i.e., that homeowners had to bring an action to enforce rescission in order for rescission to be effective? That’s gone now.

So now they are saying that the likelihood of the defeat of the homeowner in a hypothetical lawsuit directed at vacating the TILA RESCISSION means that the rescission should be ignored (but not subject to a final judgment in which the TILA Rescission is vacated. That will be gone soon too.

Judges are not empowered to render decisions based upon a hypothetical lawsuit. The lawsuit to vacate the rescission must be real and must be filed by a party with standing. And standing cannot be based upon the note and mortgage which are void by operation of law. Standing in such a suit can ONLY be established by a party to whom the underlying debt is owed.

These purveyors of “bad news” will continue to report each erroneous court decision (as I predicted) until once again, the US Supreme Court smacks down the bad decisions for (a) not following the statute, (b) not following the SCOTUS Jesinoski decision and (c) not following standard due process procedure. Such a decision is extremely likely considering the unanimous Jesinoski decision.

And I would ask them — “If you are so sure that TILA Rescission is a dead horse, why are YOU spending any time rebutting TILA RESCISSION?”

Once again these paid shills for the banks are intentionally confusing procedure with substance. I never said that the borrower would always prevail if TILA RESCISSION was properly challenged. I only said that the borrower’s rescission must be challenged if a creditor wants to avoid the consequences of rescission. And failing to do that means that the rescission stands, by operation of law. I have also said that only a party with standing can seek relief from a court including bringing that challenge. I have also said that on its face such a “creditor” party does not seem to be the party seeking to enforce the paper and oddly enough, might not exist at all.

The error that occurred in the remanded Jesinoski case was the assumption or presumption that the party claiming to be beneficiary under the deed of trust was an actual creditor instead of a possessor or holder of the note. As per the express wording of the TILA RESCISSION statute, such a party relying upon paper documents are relying upon a note and mortgage that are void by operation of law and thus could never be the basis of legal standing to challenge TILA RESCISSION.

The court and the parties continued with a basic erroneous assumption:  that somehow a party who claims only to be holder of a note or mortgage can somehow challenge the notice of TILA RESCISSION. By failing to challenge their opposition on the question of standing (because the note and mortgage were void) the Jesinoskis sealed their own doom. This in turn enables the sometimes nonexistent claimant for a nonexistent claim to twist legal procedure and simply attack the notice of rescission with a motion and/or affidavit instead of a complaint in which it alleges standing to sue based upon the underlying debt.

The remand of the Jesinoski case to the trial court should have resulted in a stay of the proceedings for a defined period allowing the “creditor” to affirmatively allege that it has standing because it is the party who would suffer financial injury and that all disclosures were made, —thus requesting from the court that the rescission be vacated — something that has yet to be done anywhere — despite direct advice and counsel from lawyers for the banks. The problem they face is that the banks were given 20 days to challenge rescission— just as the homeowners being given up to 3 years to invoke rescission.

Despite the FACT that a TILA RESCISSION is effective upon mailing or delivery by operation of law, the courts simply refuse to treat it that way. As a result, no order has been entered nor has it been requested by the banks — a court order in which the rescission was vacated. The banks have not asked because they know that following procedure would block  them from challenging TILA RESCISSION.

You can’t blame them. Steamrolling seems to work for the banks. It’s better than law!

But a decision from the US Supreme Court along the lines expressed in this article is likely to materially effect many of not most foreclosures where the notice of rescission was delivered prior to the foreclosure sale or the foreclosure judgment.

PRACTICE HINT: If you are dealing with a party claiming rights to foreclose on the basis of being “holder”, that is probably an admission that they are not a creditor. Hence they would not have legal standing to demand relief from a court when seeking to vacate the rescission. If they had purchased the underlying debt, in all probability, they would assert themselves as having the status of a “holder in due course” (and of course prove it). This needs to be fleshed out in discovery — and by demanding discovery on the issue of standing you are highlighting the fact that the rescission is effective and that a challenge to rescission must be a pleading of a case of action — in other words, where they are forced to allege their basis for asserting legal standing.

TILA RESCISSION: The Bottom Line for Now

Probably the main fallacy of the people who say that TILA Rescission is not possible or viable is that they project the outcome of a lawsuit to vacate rescission. Based upon their conjecture, they assume that Rescission is no more than a technicality. Congress, and SCOTUS beg to differ. It was enacted into law 50 years ago in an effort to prevent unscrupulous banks from screwing consumer borrowers.

Let us help you plan your TILA RESCISSION narrative and strategy: 202-838-6345. Ask for a Consult.

Register now for Neil Garfield’s Mastering Discovery and Evidence in Foreclosure Defense webinar.

Get a Consult and TEAR (Title & Encumbrances Analysis and & Report) 202-838-6345. The TEAR replaces and greatly enhances the former COTA (Chain of Title Analysis, including a one page summary of Title History and Gaps).
https://www.vcita.com/v/lendinglies to schedule CONSULT, leave message or make payments. It’s better than calling!
THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.
—————-

I keep getting emails from non lawyers who have a “legal opinion” that not only differs from mine, but also the opinion of hundreds of lawyers who represent the banks and servicers. They say that because disclosures were probably made that rescission is nothing more than a gimmick that will never succeed and they point to the many case decisions in which courts have ruled erroneously in favor of the banks despite a rescission that eliminated the subject matter jurisdiction of the court, since the loan contract, note and mortgage no longer exist. The debt, however, continues to exist even if it is unclear as to the identity of the party to whom it is owed.

First the courts ruled erroneously when they said that tender had to be made before rescission was effective. Then the courts said that no rescission could be effective without a court saying it was effective. That one put the burden on proving the figure to make proper disclosure on the homeowner. The Supreme Court of the United States, (SCOTUS — see Jesinoski v Countrywide) after thousands of decisions by trial and appellate courts, told them they were wrong. As of this date, no court has ever ruled that the rescission was vacated — the only thing that could stop it.

The lay naysayers keep harping on how wrong I am about rescission. Unfortunately many people believe what they read just because it is in writing. In my case I simply instruct the lawyers and homeowners to simply read the TILA Rescission statute and the unanimous SCOTUS decision in Jesinoski. What they will discover is that I am only repeating what they said — not making it up as some would have you believe.

To the naysayers and  all persons in doubt, i say the following:

As I have repeatedly said, in practice you are right, for the time being.
But the legal decision from SCOTUS will undoubtedly change the practice. The law is obvious and clear. SCOTUS already said that. So no interpretation is required or even permissible. SCOTUS said that too. TILA Rescission is mainly a procedural statute, not a substantive one. SCOTUS said that too. On the issue of when rescission is effective, it is upon mailing (USPS) or delivery. SCOTUS said that too. On the issue of what else a borrower needs to do to make TILA rescission effective, the answer is nothing. SCOTUS said that too.

Hence the current argument that you keep making is true “in practice” but only for the moment. SCOTUS will soon issue another scathing attack on the presumptuous courts who defied its ruling in Jesinoski. There can be no doubt that SCOTUS will rule that any “interpretation” that contradicts the following will be void, for lack of jurisdiction, because the loan contract is canceled and the note and mortgage are void:

  1. No court may change the meaning of the words of the TILA Rescission statute.
  2. Rescission is law when it is mailed or delivered.
  3. Other than delivery no action is required by the borrower. That means the loan contract is canceled and the note and mortgage are void. They do not exist by operation of law.
  4. Rescission remains effective even in the absence of a pleading filed by the borrower to enforce it.
  5. Due process is required to vacate the rescission. That means pleading standing and that proper disclosure was made, an opportunity for the borrower to respond, and then proof that the pleader has standing and that proper disclosures were made.
  6. Pleading against the rescission must be filed within 20 days or it is waived.
  7. At the end of one year both parties waive any remedies. That means the borrower can no longer enforce the duties imposed on the debt holder and the debt holder may no longer claim repayment.
  8. The only claim for repayment that exists after rescission is via the TILA Rescission statute — not the note and mortgage. This is based upon the actual debt, not the loan contract or closing documents.
  9. Any claim for repayment after rescission is predicated on full compliance with the three duties imposed by statute.
  10. A court may — upon proper notice, pleading and hearing — change the order of creditor compliance with the three duties imposed upon the debt holder. This does not mean that the court can remove any of the duties of the debt holder nor summarily ignore the rescission without issuing an order — upon proper notice, pleading and proof — that the rescission is vacated because the proper disclosures were made or for any other valid legal reason that does not change the wording of the statute.
  11. The three duties, which may not be ignored, include payment of money to the borrower, satisfaction of the lien (so that the borrower might have an opportunity to refinance), and delivery of the original canceled note.

Virtually 100% of lawyers for the banks and servicers agree with the above. They have advised their clients to file a lawsuit challenging the TILA Rescission because such a lawsuit could be easily won and would serve as a deterrent to people attempting to use TILA rescission as a defense to collection or foreclosure efforts. Yet their clients have failed to follow legal advice because they know that they have no debt holder to whom funds can be traced. If they did identify the debt holder(s) they would be showing that they played just as fast and loose with investor money as they have done with the paperwork in foreclosures.

Does this mean a free house to homeowners? Maybe. Considering how many times the loans were sold directly and indirectly, and how many times the banks received insurance, bailout and purchases from the Federal Reserve, that wouldn’t be a bad result. But the truth is that everyone knows that won’t happen unless the courts continue their decisions with blinders on.

In the end, the homeowners do owe money to the investors whose money was used too fund the loans, directly and indirectly. Whether it is secured or not may depend upon state law, but as a practical matter very few borrowers would withhold their signature from a valid mortgage and note based upon economic reality.

Even the Bank Attorneys Admit that NO Tender or lawsuit is Required in TILA Rescission. Burden is on the “lender” side.

It appears that I have struck a nerve with many of the people who seek to prove me wrong in my “theories.” They are facts, not theories. And as explained by yet another attorney writing an article for the banks and bank attorneys, it is up to the “bank” side of the equation to do anything about rescission. The borrower need do nothing except send the notice. If the “bank” side does nothing they do so at their own peril — not the homeowner’s peril. READ THE STATUTE and the unanimous decision by SCOTUS in Jesinoski v Countrywide.

Although trial judges treat the matter as unsettled or even settled opposite to the express wording of the statute and the only case that matters, the issues raised defensively by the “bank” side relative to TILA Rescission are plainly without merit and well-settled by statute and SCOTUS.

The article below seeks to point out that the TILA Rescission statute allows a court of competent jurisdiction to change the order of things — if petitioned to do so. She avoids the obvious problem: that nobody has filed such a suit because they (a) don’t have standing and (b) they are winning anyway by playing to the bias of judges.

“A borrower may effectuate rescission “by notifying the creditor.” 12 U.S.C. § 1635(a). The United States Supreme Court held in Jesinoski v. Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. that a borrower need only send written notice to a lender “in order to exercise his right to rescind”; it is not necessary for the borrower to also sue for rescission to “exercise” the right of rescission. 574 U.S. ___, 135 S.Ct. 790, 793 (2016).”

Let us help you plan your narrative and strategy: 202-838-6345. Ask for a Consult.
Register now for Neil Garfield’s Mastering Discovery and Evidence in Foreclosure Defense webinar.
Get a Consult and TEAR (Title & Encumbrances Analysis and & Report) 202-838-6345. The TEAR replaces and greatly enhances the former COTA (Chain of Title Analysis, including a one page summary of Title History and Gaps).
https://www.vcita.com/v/lendinglies to schedule CONSULT, leave message or make payments. It’s better than calling!
THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.
—————-

SeeLaw360: When to Consider Modifying TILA Rescission Procedures

Guide to understanding TILA Rescission.
  1. If someone is giving you advice or analysis and they don’t have a law degree and some experience practicing law, ignore them.
  2. READ THE STATUTE YOURSELF: 15 USC §1635.
  3. READ THE ONLY CASE THAT MATTERS: Jesinoski v Countrywide, decided by the highest court in the land — the Supreme Court of the United States. (SCOTUS)
  4. Be prepared for push back because that is working for the “bank side.” They are wrong and they know it but they are still convincing judges to ignore the wording of the statute and ignore the word of the boss of bosses (SCOTUS).
  5. A court decision that does not vacate the rescission is no decision at all. The courts have been careful to avoid this obvious issue. Since the rescission is effective when mailed (or delivered), that is the moment when the loan contract is canceled, and the note and mortgage rendered void. Any court that moves forward despite rescission is exceeding its jurisdictional authority as there is no longer subject matter jurisdiction.

There many shills and well intended people out there on the internet who have strong opinions about TILA Rescission. Nearly all of them have no law degree and no experience practicing law and lack any useful knowledge about court procedure. They should be ignored. Even the “bank” lawyers ignore them.

Their erroneous points come down to this:

  1. if the disclosures to the borrower were complete, then rescission doesn’t count
  2. it is up to the borrower to make TILA rescission effective.
  3. if the borrower cannot tender the principal back then the rescission is not effective.
  4. the TILA statute allows courts to change the order of duties of the “bank” side and the borrower side.

All four points are dead wrong because of due process. You can’t get relief unless you plead for it. So far the “bank” side has convinced judges they don’t need to file a pleading to get rid of an effective TILA Rescission. That is going to change.

The statute contains no presumptions that the disclosures are complete. In our legal system that means that a party with standing must bring an action that requests relief from rescission on the grounds that disclosure was complete. And they must bring such an action timely under the TILA Rescission Statute (i.e, within 20 days).

TILA rescission is effective at the moment of mailing or delivery by operation of law (i.e., the TILA Statute). The Supreme Court has already ruled unanimously that no lawsuit or other action is required by the borrower on the issue of rescission. Sending it means the loan contract is canceled and the note and mortgage are void.

No tender of money or property is required by the TILA statute in order to make rescission effective. This is not a theory. This is what the statute says and what the Supreme Court of the United States says. You can disagree with it all you want but the matter is legally settled.

The fact that the statute allows the court to reorder the statutory duties and obligations does not mean anyone asked the court to do so. If they did, the borrower would be entitled to due process — i.e., time to respond to the new order of things. Obviously that pleading is not going to submitted by the borrower. Just as obviously that pleading must be filed seeking relief from the rescission and allowing due process — i.e., litigation over whether the sending of the rescission was lawful but only in the context of a pleading filed by a party with standing.

And that is the point. There probably is no party with standing once you strip away the note and mortgage. The owner of the debt is most likely unknown. And that is where we are. Eventually SCOTUS will rule again on TILA Rescission. If the next ruling is consistent with their last ruling they will once again strike down the procedures and substance of court rulings that ignore the existence of the TILA rescission which was effective by operation of law, from the moment it was sent or delivered.

Here are some relevant quotes from the article cited above, written by an attorney working for a firm that represents banks:

Lenders at times find themselves assessing how to handle a claim by a borrower that he or she is entitled to rescind a loan under the Truth in Lending Act (TILA). Rescission under TILA is distinct from common law rescission due to one main difference: unlike common law rescission, which requires the rescinding party to tender any benefits received under the contract back to the other party as a condition precedent, TILA allows a borrower to exercise the right of rescission before such tender must occur. This can result in putting a lender on its heels, seeking to defend against the merits of a TILA rescission claim before even knowing if the borrower can fully effectuate the rescission by ultimately tendering the proceeds of the loan back to the lender.

However, it is possible to avoid this situation, even when operating within the framework of TILA. A strategically useful but often under-utilized tool for lenders in litigation involving rescission under TILA is to seek an order altering the statutorily prescribed procedures for rescission.

Overview of Rescission under TILA

Ordinarily, under section 1635(a) of TILA, a borrower has the unconditional right to rescind a loan for three days after the consummation of the transaction, delivery of notice that the borrower has a right to rescind or delivery of all material disclosures – whichever comes later.[1] Thus, if the lender provides the borrower with the requisite material disclosures upon closing the loan, a borrower’s right of rescission under TILA is extinguished after three days.

Assuming, however, that a lender does not provide a borrower with all necessary “material disclosures,”[2] section 1635(f) of TILA extends a borrower’s right of rescission to three years after the consummation of the transaction.[3]

While common law rescission requires a rescinding party to tender the benefits received pursuant to an agreement back to the other party as a condition precedent, TILA prescribes otherwise. Section 1635(b) states that when a borrower “exercises his right to rescind under subsection (a), he is not liable for any finance or other charge, and any security interest given by the obligor … becomes void upon such a rescission.”[4] Moreover, upon the exercise of rescission “under subsection (a)” of TILA, the lender is required to return any down payments provided by the borrower and “take any action necessary or appropriate to reflect the termination of any security interest created under the transaction” within 20 days of receiving a notice of rescission.[5] Only after a lender performs its obligations under subsection (b) is the borrower required to tender back any benefits received, such as loan proceeds.[6] Notably, however, both section 1635(b) and TILA’s implementing regulation, Regulation Z, provide that the procedures for rescission under TILA may be modified by court order.[7]

 

 

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