Beware of the new lending bubble

What is clear to me is that nothing has changed except the government complicity in predatory lending practices is increasing despite the passage of Dodd Frank. A fact that keeps getting buried here is that Federal Law (Truth in Lending Act) puts the burden of determining affordability of an alleged loan product on the lender, not the borrower. That is the whole point of the Act — to avoid mistakes that borrowers might make with sales pitches that will result in financial ruin for borrowers and extreme wealth for underwriters on Wall Street.

When you see “CashCall” offering loans to people who have a FICO score of 585, we all should ask “how can they make money on alleged loans that are going to fail.” Legally the question becomes one that scares the hell out of the banks: having given a loan to someone who needed their help in making the down payment and who have a bad credit history, is the defense to the foreclosure action properly stated if “assumption of risk” or some other related defense is asserted?

The additional question is who is putting up the money for national advertisements on TV, radio and written media to get as many people as possible to take a loan they cannot pay. This is especially true when an alleged adjustable rate mortgage is involved with negative amortization and a teaser payment.

If the burden of affordability is on the lender and not the borrower and the loan resets to a payment higher than the entire household income the outcome is guaranteed to produce a “loss” that will be covered by multiple levels of derivative and hedge products that will turn the loss into a windfall for the intermediaries.

The effect of the foreclosure is that it rubber stamps plainly illegal behavior. The good faith estimate is completely  fictitious. The term of the loan is not 30 years; it is 3 years or whenever the loan resets. That means whatever fees are amortized over the life of the loan should be amortized over 3 years, not 30. So the cost of credit is falsely stated.

And of course the primary directive of TILA that the lender be disclosed is being completely overlooked. CashCall is not lending the money in the sense that they have no risk of loss. The value of the loan to CashCall must be in the fees it receives for acting as a sham conduit.

I also doubt if the promissory notes executed by borrowers in such a situation are negotiable instruments, especially when you consider the possibility of TILA rescission, which is a condition not stated on the face of the note.Shows how securitization worked. Partially correct. BEST IN CLASS

I give the following video a 90%+ rating. It doesn’t cover the sham conduit originator but otherwise it appears totally correct.

Shows how securitization worked. Partially correct. BEST IN CLASS

Check this out:

No Savings? No Problem. These Companies Are Helping Home Buyers With Down Payments
The Wall Street Journal

Lenders are coming up with novel ways for buyers to cobble together down payments. Read the full story

Now Playing! 6pm Eastern! The West Coast Foreclosure Show with Charles Marshall: Sanctions & Motions directed at the Litigant and/or their Attorney

Charles Marshall Logo Southern California

Thursdays LIVE! Click in to the The Neil Garfield Show

Or call in at (347) 850-1260, 6pm Eastern Thursdays

This edition of the West Coast Foreclosure Hour features California attorney Charles Marshall who will address sanctions and motions directed at you as litigant and/or your attorney including:

 – removing lis pendens;

– supposed failure to respond properly to discovery;

– maintaining a ‘frivolous’ lawsuit, such as where there has been a possible res judicata issue

Charles Marshall who specializes in wrongful foreclosure, will discuss why homeowners should reconsider taking their foreclosure attorney to the Bar and the potential ramifications for you as a litigant or would be litigant.  He will cover why doing so can result in a decision that can hurt all homeowners and others trying to take on the Big Banks.

Charles Marshall serves the state of California.  Please contact him to discuss your foreclosure issue:

Charles Marshall, Esq.

Law Office of Charles T. Marshall

415 Laurel St., #405

San Diego, CA 92101

cmarshall@marshallestatelaw.com

Phone 619.807.2628

CFPB Enforcement Contact Information

MAIN NUMBER: 202-838-NEIL (6345).

Get a Consult!

https://www.vcita.com/v/lendinglies to schedule, leave message or make payments.

Our Services:  https://livinglies.wordpress.com/2016/04/11/what-can-you-do-for-me-an-overview-of-services-offered-by-neil-garfield/

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Thanks to Cementboots who posted this information on the blog:

Want help from the CFPB?

Attorneys for Plaintiff
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

ANTHONY ALEXIS
Enforcement Director

CARA PETERSEN
Deputy Enforcement Director For Litigation

GABRIEL O’MALLEY
Assistant Litigation Deputy

Jean Healey
E-mail: jean.healey@cfpb.gov
Phone: 202-435-7514
Facsimile: (202) 435-7722
1700 G Street NW
Washington, DC 20552

Jan Singelmann
E-mail: jan.singelmann@cfpb.gov
Phone: 202-435-9670
Facsimile: (202) 435-7722
1700 G Street NW
Washington, DC 20552

Atur Desai
E-mail: atur.desai@cfpb.gov
Phone: 202-435-7978
Facsimile: (202) 435-7722
1700 G Street NW
Washington, DC 20552

 

Legal Mal Suit Against Foreclosure Lawyers Proceeds

A woman claiming she had to sell her home because of her lawyers’ botched foreclosure work can move forward with her legal malpractice and fraud suit, a federal judge has ruled.

Christine Bernstein sued Keaveney Legal Group along with lawyers James P. Keaveney and Joshua Thomas for violations of the Pennsylvania Unfair Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Law common-law fraud, and violations of the federal Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act.

Bernstein claimed the firm never obtained a loan modification from her bank as she requested, but billed her just the same. She also claimed she had to work with the bank herself, and ultimately sold her home for less than she would have received if it wasn’t in foreclosure to cover the fees that had accrued on her mortgage.

The argument over whether Bernstein’s legal malpractice claims should survive hinged on the validity of her certificate of merit indicating that the defendants’ legal work was subpar, according to U.S. District Judge Jan E. DuBois of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania’s opinion.

The firm and lawyers argued Bernstein’s certificate was invalid because she submitted only one for multiple defendants and it did not engage in an independent review of the facts of the case. DuBois, however, rejected the defendants’ arguments.

Citing the 1998 Eastern District case of Ramos v. Quien, DuBois wrote, “‘To the extent that the purpose of the COM requirement is to ensure that professional liability claims are meritorious, [a single COM addressing multiple defendants] satisfie[s] that purpose.'”

DuBois reasoned that Bernstein’s certificate sufficed for all parties.

As for their second claim, DuBois said Rule 1042, pertaining to the certificate of merit, “does not require that the COM be executed by someone with actual knowledge of the facts of the case, and defendants point to no case law supporting dismissal on this basis. Rather, courts have dismissed cases only when the plaintiff made ‘no effort’ to comply with Rule 1042.”

The judge also denied the defendants’ motion to strike Bernstein’s request for punitive damages.

“Plaintiff alleges that although she paid defendants more than $8,000 to assist her with her foreclosure, defendants failed to file certain documents on her behalf with the court and with Santander. Whether the alleged conduct is outrageous is a fact question,” DuBois said.

Bernstein is represented by Mark L. Rhoades of Gowen Rhoades Winograd & Silva.

“With this decision, those who have been subjected to unfair trade practices such as aggressive sales tactics can rest assured that the protections of the Pennsylvania Unfair Trade Practices and Consumer Protection Law are alive and well.  We look forward to starting the discovery process and seeking a full recovery for Ms. Bernstein.  Given today’s ruling, that recovery could include punitive damages as well as trebled damages and attorneys’ fees under the UTPCPL,” Rhoades said.

The defendants are represented by Cecil Jones of Marks, O’Neill, O’Brien, Doherty & Kelly. Jones did not respond to a request for comment.

http://www.thelegalintelligencer.com/id=1202786615905/Legal-Mal-Suit-Against-Foreclosure-Lawyers-Proceeds-?mcode=1202617075166&curindex=0&slreturn=20170419153241

The First Step in Foreclosure Defense: Title Issues

The same judges that consistently ignore defenses with respect to the endorsements, assignments, or other issues instantly recognize that where there is an error or break in the chain of title, the “bank” must step back, dismiss the foreclosure and start over again.

THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.
—————-

Last Thursday night I had North Carolina Attorney James Surane as a guest on my radio show. As I suspected it was technical but VERY interesting. He gave many examples where title issues had either resulted in an outright win or much greater leverage over the party claiming to be authorized to foreclose on property. In his state of North Carolina, the judicial climate is very frosty when it comes to a homeowner challenging foreclosures. But the same judges that consistently ignore defenses with respect to the endorsements, assignments, or other issues instantly recognize that where there is an error or break in the chain of title, the “bank” must step back, dismiss the foreclosure and start over again.

Although most people have stopped ordering title searches and title analysis by a lawyer, they are throwing out the baby with the bathwater. As I have previously discussed on this blog, the problem with the title reports is not that they are useless, it is that they don’t go back far enough. In the run-up to the mortgage meltdown some closing agents were processing loan closings at the rate of 100 per day. These agents and lawyers were overwhelmed by the volume. They made mistakes.

Here is a summary of what Jim said last Thursday night:

FIRST STEP IN FORECLOSURE DEFENSE CASE:

A thorough title search of the property being subject to foreclosure is an absolute necessity. This includes researching back to the plat in the case of a home in a subdivision, and back 30 years in a case in which the property is not in a subdivision. We have won many cases based upon errors in the chain of title. It must be remembered that a large majority of the mortgages that we deal with today were closed between the years of 1992 – 2007. During these years, closing attorneys and lenders were overwhelmed with business, and as a result many errors in preparing documents that compromised the lenders lien rights. In our title search, we are looking for:

  • Plat was recorded prior to conveyance of lot
  • Errors in the legal descriptions
  • The legal description was attached at the time the deed of trust was signed
  • Errors in the timing of the recordation of documents in the chain of title
  • Errors in the spelling of the grantor or grantee names
  • Both Grantors names in the body of the Deed of Trust and not just signed
  • Failure to include all necessary signatures on deeds
  • Recordings in the wrong county
  • The grantor owned the property at the time of the conveyance
  • The date on the note matches the date of the deed of trust
  • The names on the note match the names on the deed of trust
  • The grantors signed the Deed of Trust in the proper place (not under notary)
  • Check the Secretary of State on all corporate grantors
  • The date the substitute trustee was appointed relative to the Notice of Hearing
  • The proper substitute trustee filed the Notice of Hearing

Surane has won at least one case for each and every issue listed above. Some of the issues listed above have resulted in our winning several cases. Clerks and Judges are not reserved about recognizing errors in the chain of title, and will readily dismiss a case if the errors are properly presented to the Court. It is very important to thoroughly examine the chain of title before proceeding to identity errors with the lenders standing and endorsements to the promissory note.  As many people are aware, the standing and endorsement issues often lead to fertile ground for many additional defenses to a foreclosure action.

North Carolina is more or less a non-judicial state. But instead of the “trustee” recording a notice of default and notice of sale, the trustee in North Carolina files a Notice of Hearing. The Clerk actually has some power to either dismiss or require the filer to dismiss if the chain of title is clearly wrong. This makes North Carolina a somewhat safer place for homeowners than other non-judicial states because there is at least some minimum oversight over the process.

Not all errors in title result in an outright win in Court. But they do create a time interval that could be as long as years in which the homeowner can properly address other issues and seek modification.

At livinglies we provide a title report and an analysis, but most people don’t want to pay the extra cost of going back 3-4 owners. And they don’t want to spend time on a lawyer analyzing title issues. It’s boring stuff to most people. Most vendors providing title information CAN produce a report going back 30 years but they don’t because they have not been paid the extra money to do so — often requiring an actual trip to the building where the public records are kept in the county in which the property is located.

Some vendors, like TitleTracs, will point out potential areas of inquiry that assist a lawyer in analyzing title, but most lawyers don’t want to do the work even if they could get paid for it. It is a laborious task but people are missing “low hanging fruit” when they fail to raise a proper challenge to the substitution of trustee and other defenses.

The bad news is that Surane agrees with my current opinion — it is highly unlikely that any judge anywhere will enter an order quieting title where the mortgage or deed of trust is removed as an encumbrance to the property. Unless the mortgage or deed of trust is void, in our opinion it is not proper to bring the quiet title action. BUT, that said, as Surane pointed out on the show, he has made extensive use of declaratory actions that undermine the enforceability of the mortgage or deed of trust and potentially undermine the note as well. The catch is that courts don’t issue advisory opinions so you need a present controversy in order to get the court to rule.

If this article prompts you to order our COMBO Title and Securitization Report and you want the kind of in-depth title report that is described above the cost of the report is $1995.

Get a consult or order services! 202-838-6345

https://www.vcita.com/v/lendinglies to schedule CONSULT, leave message or make payments.

 

 

 

California Suspends Dealings with Wells Fargo

The real question is when government agencies and regulators PLUS law enforcement get the real message: Wells Fargo’s behavior in the account scandal is the tip of the iceberg and important corroboration of what most of the country has been saying for years — their business model is based upon fraud.

Wells Fargo has devolved into a PR machine designed to raise the price of the stock at the expense of trust, which in the long term will most likely result in most customers abandoning such banks for fear they will be the next target.

Get a consult! 202-838-6345

https://www.vcita.com/v/lendinglies to schedule CONSULT, leave message or make payments.
THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.
—————-

see http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/article104739911.html

John Chiang, California Treasurer, has stopped doing business with Wells Fargo because of the scheme involving fraud, identity theft and customer gouging for services they never ordered on accounts they never opened. It is once again time for Government to scrutinize the overall business plan and business map of Wells Fargo and indeed all of the top (TBTF) banks.

Wells Fargo is attempting to do crisis management, to wit: making sure that nobody looks at other schemes inside the bank.

It is the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) that was conceived by Senator Elizabeth Warren who has revealed the latest example of big bank fraud.

The simple fact is that in this case, Wells Fargo management made an absurd demand on their employees. Instead of the national average of 3 accounts per person they instructed managers and employees to produce 8 accounts per customer. Top management of Wells Fargo have been bankers for decades. They knew that most customers would not want, need or accept 5 more accounts. Yet they pressed hard on employees to meet this “goal.” Their objective was to defraud the investing public who held or would buy Wells Fargo stock.

In short, Wells Fargo is now the poster child for an essential defect in business structure of public companies. They conceive their “product” to be their stock. That is how management makes its money and that is how investors holding their stock like it until they realize that the entire platform known as Wells Fargo has devolved into a PR machine designed to raise the price of the stock at the expense of trust, which in the long term will most likely result in most customers abandoning such banks for fear they will be the next target. Such companies are eating their young and producing a bubble in asset values that, like the residential mortgage market, cannot be sustained by fundamental facts — i.e., real earnings on a real trajectory of growth.

So the PR piece about how they didn’t know what was going on is absurd along with their practices. Such policies don’t start with middle management or employees. They come from the top. And the goal was to create the illusion of a rapidly growing bank so that more people would buy their stock at ever increasing prices. That is what happens when you don’t make the individual members of management liable under criminal and civil laws for engaging in such behavior.

There was only one way that the Bank could achieve its goal of 8 accounts per customer — it had to be done without the knowledge or consent of the customers. Now Wells Fargo is trying to throw 5,000 employees under the bus. But this isn’t the first time that Wells Fargo has arrogantly thrown its customers and employees under the bus.

The creation of financial accounts in the name of a person without that person’s knowledge or consent is identity theft, assuming there was a profit motive. The result is that the person is subjected to false claims of high fees, their credit rating has a negative impact, and they are stuck dealing with as bank so large that most customers feel that they don’t have the resources to do anything once the fraud was discovered by the Consumer Financial protection Board (CFPB).

Creating a loan account for a loan that doesn’t exist is the same thing. In most cases the “loan closings” were shams — a show put on so that the customer would sign documents in which the actual party who loaned the money was left out of the documentation.

This was double fraud because the pension funds and other investors who deposited money with Wells Fargo and the other banks did so under the false understanding that their money would be used to buy Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS) issued by a trust with assets consisting of a loan pool.

The truth has emerged — there were no loan pols in the trusts. The entire derivative market for residential “loans” is built on a giant lie.  But the consequences are so large that Government is afraid to do anything about it. Wells Fargo took money from pension funds and other “investors,” but did not give the proceeds of sale of the alleged MBS to the proprietary vehicle they created in the form of a trust.

Hence the trust was never funded and never acquired any property or loans. That means the “mortgage backed securities” were not mortgage backed BUT they were “Securities” under the standard definition such that the SEC should take action against the underwriters who disguised themselves as “master Servicers.”

In order to cover their tracks, Wells Fargo carefully coached their employees to take calls and state that there could be no settlement or modification or any loss mitigation unless the “borrower” was at least 90 days behind in their payments. So people stopped paying an entity that had no right to receive payment — with grave consequences.

The 90 day statement was probably legal advice and certainly a lie. There was no 90 day requirement and there was no legal reason for a borrower to go into a position where the pretender lender could declare a default. The banks were steering as many people, like cattle, into defaults because of coercion by the bank who later deny that they had instructed the borrower to stop making payments.

So Wells Fargo and other investment banks were opening depository accounts for institutional customers under false pretenses, while they opened up loan accounts under false pretenses, and then  used the identity of BOTH “investors” and “borrowers” as a vehicle to steal all the money put up for investments and to make money on the illusion of loans between the payee on the note and the homeowner.

In the end the only document that was legal in thee entire chain was a forced sale and/or judgment of foreclosure. When the deed issues in a forced sale, that creates virtually insurmountable presumptions that everything that preceded the sale was valid, thus changing history.

The residential mortgage loan market was considerably more complex than what Wells Fargo did with the opening of the unwanted commercial accounts but the objective was the same — to make money on their stock and siphon off vast sums of money into off-shore accounts. And the methods, when you boil it all down, were the same. And the arrogant violation of law and trust was the same.

 

Who is the Creditor? NY Appellate Decision Might Provide the Knife to Cut Through the Bogus Claim of Privilege

The crux of this fight is that if the foreclosing parties are forced to identify the creditors they will only have two options, in my opinion: (a) commit perjury or (b) admit that they have no knowledge or access to the identity of the creditor

Get a consult! 202-838-6345

https://www.vcita.com/v/lendinglies to schedule CONSULT, leave message or make payments.
THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A LEGAL OPINION UPON WHICH YOU CAN RELY IN ANY INDIVIDUAL CASE. HIRE A LAWYER.
—————-

see http://4closurefraud.org/2016/06/10/opinion-here-ny-court-says-bank-of-america-must-disclose-communications-with-countrywide-in-ambac-suit/

We have all seen it a million times — the “Trustees”, the “servicers” and their agents and attorneys all beg the question of identifying the names and contact information of the creditors in foreclosure actions. The reason is simple — in order to answer that question truthfully they would be required to admit that there is no party that could properly be defined as a creditor in relation to the homeowner.

They have successfully pushed the point beyond the point of return — they are alleging that the homeowner is a debtor but they refuse to identify a creditor; this means they are being allowed to treat the homeowner as a debtor while at the same time leaving the identity of the creditor unknown. The reason for this ambiguity is that the banks, from the beginning, were running a scheme that converted the money paid by investors for alleged “mortgage backed securities”; the conversion was simple — “let’s make their money our money.”

When inquiry is made to determine the identity of the creditor the only thing anyone gets is some gibberish about the documents PLUS the assertion that the information is private, proprietary and privileged.  The case in the above link is from an court of appeals in New York. But it could have profound persuasive effect on all foreclosure litigation.

Reciting the tension between liberal discovery and privilege, the court tackles the confusion in the lower courts. The court concludes that privilege is a very narrow shield in specific situations. It concludes that even the attorney-client privilege is a shield only between the client and the attorney and that adding a third party generally waives that privilege. The third party privilege is only extended in narrow circumstances where the parties are seeking a common goal. So in order to prevent the homeowner from getting the information on his alleged creditor, the foreclosing parties would need to show that there is a common goal between the creditor(s) and the debtor.

Their problem is that they can’t do that without showing, at least in camera, that the identity of the creditor is known and that somehow the beneficiaries of an empty trust have a common goal (hard to prove since the trust is empty contrary to the terms of the “investment”). Or, they might try to identify a creditor who is neither the trust nor the investors, which brings us back to perjury.

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